Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943

The Octo

Blogging Early America

Feeds from popular blogs selected by Katy Telling, Ph.D student at William & Mary, and Joseph M. Adelman, Assistant Editor, Digital Initiatives

Uncommon Sense - the blog

Uncommon Sense - the blog

A blog post by Karin Wulf Note: This is the last blog post by Karin Wulf in her role as executive director of the Omohundro Institute. Her final day at the head of the team is today. We congratulate her and wish her the best of luck in her new role as the Director and Librarian of the John Carter Brown Library. October 14, 2021—The Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture has a long and significant history.  Founded in 1943 as the Institute of Early American History & Cult

CHA Teaching and Learning Blog

G. Patrick O’Brien This post was first published on the CHA website in December 2020 and is being posted again in the context of Women's History......

JHU Press Blog

By Arthur Levine and Scott Van Pelt In January of 2015, Arthur and Scott met for the first time at a small restaurant in New York’s West Village....

The Village Broadside

Guest blog contributors Tyler Rudd Putman and Henry Cooke examine a 1760 shipping invoice for ready-made clothing to Boston merchant-tailor William Waine. The authors explore the clothing trade in mid-18th-century Boston....

Boundary Stones

On the night of February 24, 1867 in the nation’s capital, Scarlet Crow, a visiting Sioux chief, mysteriously disappeared. No one knows for sure what happened. Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate oral history proposed that he was kidnapped, while the Evening Star newspaper put forth that h...

The Charleston Museum

For many years, mummies have evoked a sense of the macabre. Illustrated as lumbering, linen-wrapped figures stumbling toward its victim with outreached arms, they have become a symbol for monsters in horror movies and gothic fiction. However, mummification for ancient Egyptians, was a respected and ...

Behind the Scenes

The Beekman Family Coach is one of the New-York Historical Society’s most unique objects. It is also one of only three 18th-century carriages used in colonial North America that is known to survive in original condition. A curatorial intern at the Museum, I’m a Ph.D. candidate in American &...

Common-place

Arnold’s unceasing efforts to elevate himself in society through marriage and professional work can be viewed through the lens of the houses he bought or built throughout his life. The post Benedict Arnold’s House: The Making and Unmaking of an American appeared first on Commonplace....