Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Getting the most out of the 2019 OI annual conference

· June 7th, 2019 · No Comments

Adopt these strategies when attending the OI 25th annual conference next week (June 13-15) at the University of Pittsburgh and remember to join us on Twitter at #OIAnnual2019. by Carl Keyes (Assumption College) Are you attending your first Omohundro Institute conference and want to get the most out of it?  Here are some strategies for… Read More »

Data Management for #VastEarlyAmerica

· June 6th, 2019 · No Comments

Join Jessica M. Parr for the 2019 THis Camp, “Digital Management for Historians: a system for keeping track of data including syllabi, projects, and research” on Thursday, June 13, 2:00 pm, at the 25th annual OI conference at the University of Pittsburgh.  by Jessica M. Parr, Simmons University Like so many things these days, the… Read More »

Origins of a collaboration

· May 31st, 2019 · 1 Comment

by Elizabeth A. Dolan and Ahmed Idrissi Alami The authors of “Muhammad Kabā Saghanughu’s Arabic Address on the Occasion of Emancipation in Jamaica” (William and Mary Quarterly, April 2019) discuss how they came to collaborate on the piece. Beth: Our collaborative journey began with an unexpected find. I’d traveled to the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland in… Read More »

Making the Personal Historical: Reflections on Pregnancy and Birth

· May 9th, 2019 · No Comments

This post accompanies “Motherhood in Early America,” episode 237 of Ben Franklin’s World. It was originally posted at the Junto and has been lightly revised. by Lindsay M. Keiter Human reproduction is simultaneously unchanged and radically different over time and across cultures. This paradox has preoccupied me since 2017, when I carried and gave birth… Read More »

The Double-Edged Sword of Motherhood Under American Slavery

· May 7th, 2019 · 3 Comments

This post accompanies “Motherhood in Early America,” episode 237 of Ben Franklin’s World. by Emily West Mother’s Day offers opportunities to reflect upon motherhood in relation to ethnicity and class. Racial discrimination and poverty mean that a narrow conceptualization of biological motherhood associated with domestic care and nurture is not applicable to all in the… Read More »

Must Early America Be Vast?

· May 2nd, 2019 · 4 Comments

by Karin Wulf Spoiler:  I think yes. But it’s complicated.  You may have seen this meme about historians, with “it’s complicated” mocked as the weak battle cry of our profession.  I would argue that there is ample demonstration, from contemporary politics to technology, that an appreciation of complexity is newly resurgent.  And so it is… Read More »