Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

OI History: Tales from Former Apprentices, Conclusion

· November 7th, 2018 · No Comments

OI History: Tales from Former Apprentices, Conclusion

August 2nd, 2010. That was the day I first stepped foot in the offices of the OI to begin my training in the legendary Apprenticeship in Historical Editing program. My apprenticeship only lasted the year but I continued on in the Ph.D. program at William & Mary which allowed me to remain connected to the OI through the Tuesday colloquia, lecture series, and conferences—all of which graduate students are always welcomed to attend. All of this exposure to scholarly excellence shaped my time as a graduate student and budding scholar of early America in profound ways.

And clearly I’m not alone in the way I view and value my experience as an apprentice. Over the past several weeks we’ve heard from some of our former apprentii– Anna Roberts, Kevin Butterfield, Martha J. King, J. Frederick Fausz, Sherry Babbitt, and Sean Harvey have all shared wonderful memories from their time as OI apprentices.

I’m also not alone in the fact that I returned to the OI as a full-time staff member. Director of development Shawn A. Holl (‘92-‘93), the managing editor of the WMQ, Margaret T. Musselwhite (’04-’05), the managing editor of OI Books, Virginia Montijo Chew (’92-’93), and OI Books manuscript editor, Kaylan M. Stevenson (’11-’12) all were former apprentices as well.* And of course, Fredrika Teute, former editor of books, was an apprentice in the 70s.

If you were a former apprentice and are attending the AHA in January, we’d love to see you! Contact Shawn Holl if you’d like to attend special OI-AHA events. If you can’t make it to the AHA, consider becoming an OI Associate to stay up to date on the William and Mary Quarterly and new OI Books. We hope to hear from you!

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