Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Archive for the ‘digital projects’ Category

A Hamilton-Inspired Playlist from Ben Franklin’s World

· December 5th, 2018 · No Comments

Since its Broadway premiere in 2015, Hamilton: An American Musical has taken the world by storm. For many who have seen Hamilton, the undeniable star of the show is not the young, scrappy, and hungry title character or his tempered frenemy Burr, but the resplendent George III. The sardonic king interjects at three different points… Read More »

A “Digital Research in Early America” recap

· November 14th, 2018 · 1 Comment

by Maeve Kane In October 2018, I participated in the WMQ-UCI Digital Research in Early America workshop hosted by Sharon Block and Josh Piker at University of California-Irvine. This post aims to give those who weren’t able to attend an idea of the conversations and common themes of the new scholarship presented. Most broadly, the… Read More »

Doing History Season 3- Biography

· October 19th, 2018 · No Comments

Doing History Season 3: Biography If biographies tell us about the past, why do bookstores and libraries always shelve them separately from history books? When historians write biographies, do they approach things differently? And if so how? These questions got us thinking and so we decided to dedicate season three of Doing History to them.… Read More »

Happy 4th Birthday, Ben Franklin’s World!

· October 12th, 2018 · No Comments

This week the Omohundro Institute’s award winning podcast, Ben Franklin’s World: a Podcast about Early American History turned four years old! This made us wonder, how would Ben have celebrated? Turns out his letters might offer us some hints. In 1767, Ben gifted a poem to Mary Stevenson for her birthday: “You’d have the Custom… Read More »

Opposing Views: Do Humanists Need to Add “Digital” to Their Titles?

· October 11th, 2018 · 2 Comments

Today’s posts are courtesy of two Ph.D. candidates in the William & Mary Department of History, Alexandra Macdonald and Peter Olsen-Harbich. We asked them to address the place of digital humanities learning—in particular, tutorials in the tools required to create digital humanities projects—in their current work and education. Learning to Stretch the Digital Vellum: Digital Literacy… Read More »