Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Archive for the ‘Ben Franklin’s World’ Category

Doing History 4: Bibliography

· October 8th, 2019 · No Comments

Bibliography for Doing History 4: Understanding the Fourth Amendment Want to learn more about the Bill of Rights and the Fourth Amendment? We’ve compiled a list of suggested books, articles, popular blog posts, and online resources that you might find helpful. We either used these works ourselves for production research or they were suggested by… Read More »

1619 and Virginia

· August 6th, 2019 · 1 Comment

This post accompanies “Virginia, 1619,” episode 250 of Ben Franklin’s World. In this week’s special episode of Ben Franklin’s World, Liz Covart talks with Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Norfolk State University and an expert in African-American and American history, about the lasting impact of the events of… Read More »

The Sounds of Independence

· July 2nd, 2019 · 2 Comments

This post accompanies “Celebrating the Fourth,” episode 245 of Ben Franklin’s World. At the bottom of the post you can find suggested readings on celebrating independence in the early United States and a special bonus clip from Shira Lurie. by Emily Sneff The Fourth of July is a noisy holiday. From morning parades featuring marching… Read More »

Making the Personal Historical: Reflections on Pregnancy and Birth

· May 9th, 2019 · No Comments

This post accompanies “Motherhood in Early America,” episode 237 of Ben Franklin’s World. It was originally posted at the Junto and has been lightly revised. by Lindsay M. Keiter Human reproduction is simultaneously unchanged and radically different over time and across cultures. This paradox has preoccupied me since 2017, when I carried and gave birth… Read More »

The Double-Edged Sword of Motherhood Under American Slavery

· May 7th, 2019 · 3 Comments

This post accompanies “Motherhood in Early America,” episode 237 of Ben Franklin’s World. by Emily West Mother’s Day offers opportunities to reflect upon motherhood in relation to ethnicity and class. Racial discrimination and poverty mean that a narrow conceptualization of biological motherhood associated with domestic care and nurture is not applicable to all in the… Read More »

Podcasting History in Public

· April 3rd, 2019 · No Comments

Historians participate in a lot of conversations about public engagement. Discussions revolve around questions of what it means to engage “the public,” how we should define “the public,” whether authoring op-eds, blog posts, and Twitter threads count as a public history practice, and whether historians do enough to make their work accessible to non-specialists. These… Read More »