Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Archive for the ‘Ben Franklin’s World’ Category

Elections in Early America Podcast Series Releases TODAY!

· October 6th, 2020 · No Comments

Every year, the United States holds elections. Often these elections are for city, town, and state offices. Every two years, the United States holds federal elections, where the American people elect those who will represent and serve them in their national government.  How did elections in the United States develop? Who is American democracy for… Read More »

Reading on Elections in Vast Early America

· October 6th, 2020 · 2 Comments

Want to learn more about elections and voting in early America? We’ve compiled a list of suggested books, articles, and online resources that you might find helpful. We either used these works ourselves for production research or they were suggested by our guests. Happy researching! Books Richard R. Beeman, The Varieties of Political Experience in… Read More »

Tips and Tricks for Recording: Remote Interviews

· July 8th, 2020 · No Comments

By Liz Covart How can you record remote guests and phone calls? These were two questions people sent my way on Twitter when I asked what questions people had about mics, lighting, and sound for their virtual programs and courses.  In this last post of our three-post series on the subject of mics, sound, and… Read More »

Tips and Tricks for Recording: Video

· July 7th, 2020 · No Comments

By Liz Covart I’ve seen a lot of questions about mics, lighting, and sound floating around on Twitter as more museums and institutions move their public programming online and as educators move their teaching online. Many people want to know how they can record the best audio and video for their projects. Today’s post is… Read More »

Tips and Tricks for Recording: Sound

· July 6th, 2020 · No Comments

By Liz Covart The coronavirus pandemic has forced the world to adapt from in-person activities, such as work and school, to at-home activities. With many museums and institutions moving their public programming online and educators moving their teaching online, I’ve seen a lot of questions about mics, lighting, and sound floating around on Twitter. These… Read More »

The Many Meanings of the Fourth of July

· July 2nd, 2020 · 1 Comment

Over the past few years, we’ve steadily grown our collection of readings related to U.S. Independence Day as well as Ben Franklin’s World episodes detailing the early American history of the Fourth of July. It’s time we put it all in one place.  Frederick Douglass famously questioned Americans in 1852, “What to a Slave is… Read More »

Dreams of a Revolution Deferred

· June 30th, 2020 · No Comments

By Derrick R. Spires For Black citizens of the early United States, the Fourth of July was a yearly reminder of a revolution deferred—the always-not-yet nature of Black freedom in a “pseudo-republic.”[1] Such was the case even at the moment the Declaration of Independence was circulating. The July 15, 1776, issue of the New-York Gazette and the… Read More »