Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Author Archive

County Plats: Evidence of a 17th-Century Virginian Cartographic Culture

· August 30th, 2019 · 2 Comments

by Nathan Braccio Today’s post is courtesy of Nathan Braccio, an Omohundro Institute–Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation fellow. Nathan spent a month in Williamsburg at the OI and Jamestown this summer. During my month in Williamsburg I conducted research for my dissertation, “Parallel Landscapes: Algonquian and English Spatial Epistemologies 1500-1700.” While the bulk of my research focuses… Read More »

Teaching the Jerks 

· August 8th, 2019 · 1 Comment

Today’s post comes from Doug Winiarski, author of Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth-Century New England, published in 2017 by the Omohundro Institute with our partners at the University of North Carolina Press. Winner of the Bancroft Prize and several other awards, it is now available in paperback. Readers can learn more about Doug’s work at his personal website or contact him at dwiniars@richmond.edu. … Read More »

1619 and Virginia

· August 6th, 2019 · 1 Comment

This post accompanies “Virginia, 1619,” episode 250 of Ben Franklin’s World. In this week’s special episode of Ben Franklin’s World, Liz Covart talks with Dr. Cassandra Newby-Alexander, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Norfolk State University and an expert in African-American and American history, about the lasting impact of the events of… Read More »

Co-authoring Atlantic History in the Digital Age

· July 23rd, 2019 · No Comments

by Nicholas Radburn and Justin Roberts, co-authors of “Gold Versus Life: Jobbing Gangs and British Caribbean Slavery” in the April 2019 issue of the William and Mary Quarterly A question that we were frequently asked while writing our WMQ essay on jobbing gangs was “what is co-authorship like?” That we were asked this question so often… Read More »

How to Pick Your Next Great Read: Summer 2019 Edition

· July 11th, 2019 · No Comments

By Nadine Zimmerli Two years ago, I polled my colleagues at the OI about their summer reading habits and gathered book recommendations. In the wake of that blog post, I raced to pick up Kathy Burdette’s suggestion, David Sax’s The Revenge of Analog, and have found myself recommending it ever since. I even sent a… Read More »

The Sounds of Independence

· July 2nd, 2019 · 2 Comments

This post accompanies “Celebrating the Fourth,” episode 245 of Ben Franklin’s World. At the bottom of the post you can find suggested readings on celebrating independence in the early United States and a special bonus clip from Shira Lurie. by Emily Sneff The Fourth of July is a noisy holiday. From morning parades featuring marching… Read More »

Taking Account of Sexual Harassment

· June 21st, 2019 · 11 Comments

OI Executive Director Karin Wulf’s statement is followed by a statement from Professor Lisa Wilson of Connecticut College, and a statement from the current Council of the Omohundro Institute. Taking Account of Sexual Harassment Karin Wulf “I was at an “Institute of Early American History and Culture” (now known as the Omohundro Institute) mixer at… Read More »