Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Author Archive

Why be a joiner?

· June 26th, 2018 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf Why be a joiner? Don’t make me pull out that de Tocqueville quote about the importance of voluntary associations in civil society. Besides, it’s not necessary to quote a tourist in early nineteenth-century America to observe a truism: organizations bring people and their talents together. The Omohundro Institute has a single mission:… Read More »

The OI Book That Made Me a Historian

· June 1st, 2018 · 5 Comments

I went to college with political journalism as a career goal. A Watergate kid, I wanted to be in Washington, and I wanted to put together important stories at the ragged edges of contemporary American democracy. Instead, I was captivated by the early modern period, by early American history in particular, and it was Gordon… Read More »

We’ve Been Doing History’s History

· December 26th, 2017 · No Comments

Today’s post accompanies “Freedom and the American Revolution,” episode 166 of Ben Franklin’s World and part of the Doing History 2: To the Revolution! series. You can find supplementary materials for the episode on the OI Reader app, available through iTunes or Google Play. History is a primary context for every decision we make; our… Read More »

Hamilton’s George III in London

· December 6th, 2017 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf Hamilton, a quintessentially American story, has arrived in London.  While many American commenters and historians have focused on the “Ten Dollar Founding Father without a Father” and his compatriots, the racial politics of the founding period and the intentional casting of the musical, and the gendered politics of the Schuyler sisters and… Read More »

Transitions at the OI: Au Revoir, Brett

· June 30th, 2017 · No Comments

Today is the end of our fiscal year, as anyone who has been getting and reading our encouragement to make a gift to the OI Associates knows. For non-profits, that end of the fiscal year is an important moment to take stock of our resources and to make firmer commitments for the coming year. We… Read More »