Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Author Archive

Transitions at the OI: Au Revoir, Brett

· June 30th, 2017 · No Comments

Today is the end of our fiscal year, as anyone who has been getting and reading our encouragement to make a gift to the OI Associates knows. For non-profits, that end of the fiscal year is an important moment to take stock of our resources and to make firmer commitments for the coming year. We… Read More »

A short introduction to a very short introduction of IP

· May 10th, 2017 · No Comments

Today’s post is a reprint from yesterday’s edition of The Scholarly Kitchen. In it, Karin Wulf reviews the Very Short Introduction to Intellectual Property by Siva Vaidhyanathan (Oxford University Press). by Karin Wulf Intellectual property is the culmination of brain work:  ideas made manifest are legally defined and protected to variously advance the interests of their… Read More »

History and Institutional Memory

· April 21st, 2017 · No Comments

  It was a bright, hot, beautiful Virginia spring day when we paid our respects to Thad Tate (1924–2017) at Williamsburg’s Bruton Parish Church, his longtime congregation. As Director of the Omohundro Institute (1972–1989), and Editor and Book Review Editor of the William and Mary Quarterly before that, Thad’s formal association with and service to… Read More »

Exciting News from the NEH

· March 29th, 2017 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf National Endowment for the Humanities programs have been incalculably important to the shared understanding of the early American past. We are delighted to announce two successful NEH applications in support of the Omohundro Institute’s programs this year. The OI was awarded grants both for our residential postdoctoral fellowship program and for the… Read More »

The OI Guides to #VastEarlyAmerica

· January 18th, 2017 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf Over the life of the Omohundro Institute, the staff here in Williamsburg produced resources with the aim of helping scholars to navigate the early American field. Like the Carnegie Guides I discussed in a previous post, these inevitably reflected a contemporary understanding of “the field” as well as the communication capacity and… Read More »

Report from #VastEarlyAmerica, 2017

· January 2nd, 2017 · No Comments

Welcome to 2017, where the past is always urgent.  There are times when the present and future seem like all we can handle, but to paraphrase Santayana repeating the past is not the real danger of neglecting history.  It is that our understanding or misunderstanding of history is always, explicitly or implicitly, even when it’s… Read More »