Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

On “slow history”: Decolonizing methodologies and the importance of responsive editorial processes

· March 22nd, 2018 · No Comments

Christine DeLucia, author of “Fugitive Collections in New England Indian Country: Indigenous Material Culture and Early American History Making at Ezra Stiles’s Yale Museum” in the January 2018 edition of the William and Mary Quarterly  reflects on the broader implications of making a “simple” change to her recent article. by Christine DeLucia It wasn’t quite a “stop… Read More »

Further Thoughts on Douglas Winiarski’s Bancroft Prize-winning Book

· March 15th, 2018 · No Comments

This week we were thrilled to learn that Douglas L. Winiarski’s Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth-Century New England (OI and UNCP, 2017) was one of three books awarded the 2018 Bancroft Prize. This sweeping history of popular religion in eighteenth-century New England is simultaneously magisterial in scope and… Read More »

Building on the Legacy: Lemon Project Symposium March 16-17, 2018

· March 14th, 2018 · No Comments

Today’s post is courtesy of Ravynn Stringfield, graduate student in American Studies at William & Mary and Lemon Project Graduate Assistant. The Omohundro Institute applauds the work of the Lemon Project and has supported several past events. Most recently, the OI has joined forces with the Lemon Project to co-sponsor the OI-W&M Lemon Project Postdoctoral… Read More »

Politics, Religion, Then, Now

· February 28th, 2018 · 1 Comment

WMQ author Katherine Carté Engel (January 2018) discusses some of the questions the editorial process forced her to confront when writing her article “Connecting Protestants in Britain’s Eighteenth-century Atlantic Empire.” by Katherine Carté Engel According to the handy new tool put up by Michael McDonnell, the word “colonial” appears 138 times in titles in the WMQ.… Read More »