Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Using Colonial Virginia Portraits

· April 2nd, 2020 · No Comments

Exploring a Visual Archive with Students by Janine Yorimoto Boldt While we are all in quarantine mode, many of us adjusting to online teaching and turning to digital resources like never before, it is a good time to explore Colonial Virginia Portraits, especially if you haven’t already. If you’re looking for a digital resource to… Read More »

History in the Time of Coronavirus

· March 30th, 2020 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf Around the world we are experiencing an extraordinary simultaneous crisis. COVID-19, the coronavirus that has caused a pandemic, is affecting people very differently across geography and individual circumstances but we are all in its grip. Here at the OI we are now working fully remotely, our home campus at William & Mary is closed… Read More »

Women Also Know Washington

· March 26th, 2020 · 1 Comment

By Lindsay Chervinsky In the preface to You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington, Alexis Coe emphasizes that she is the first woman in many decades to write a cradle-to-grave biography. A modern take on the Washington biography genre is certainly welcome—if there are thousands of books on Washington, the vast majority… Read More »

Researching and Teaching VastEarlyAmerica

· March 19th, 2020 · 6 Comments

The following is a loosely (and necessarily imperfectly) organized set of online resources for researching and teaching about VastEarlyAmerica. We invite you to add suggestions to the list by leaving your comments via the form below or by contacting martha.howard@wm.edu directly. Resources Slavery Studies A database of crowd-sourced information on fugitives from slavery, compiled by University of… Read More »

The New York Times 1619 Project and the Omohundro Institute

· March 17th, 2020 · No Comments

By Karin Wulf The 1619 Project continues to attract a lot of readers and responses.  On March 6 the editor of the New York Times Magazine, Jake Silverstein, and the principal author of the New York Times 1619 Project, Nikole Hannah-Jones, convened scholars at the Times Center for a conversation centered on one of the issues that has been most… Read More »

Curious Taste: The Transatlantic Appeal of Satire

· March 5th, 2020 · No Comments

By Nancy SiegelProfessor of Art History and Culinary HistoryTowson University Queen Charlotte frying sprats, George III toasting muffins or placing a fleet of ships in an oven about to be baked like gingerbread, the Prince of Wales gorging himself on the fortunes of Empire, William Pitt carving plum pudding with Napoleon, the American colonies represented… Read More »