Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Not Your Typical Book Talks

· October 19th, 2020 · No Comments

by Catherine E. Kelly This week, we will launch the first of three online OI Author Conversations scheduled for the current academic year.  Featuring scholars whose books are forthcoming or recently published, this series will open up the research, writing, and thinking that go into making a polished product.  Unlike even the best book talks,… Read More »

Flexibility is our future

· October 16th, 2020 · No Comments

by Karin Wulf This week I learned, via a paper my son is writing, that the molecules in rubber are polymers, meaning that they are shaped like a chain.  In a resting state those molecules bunch up in a chaotic tangle, but, when you stretch them, like when you stretch a rubber band, the chains… Read More »

Elections in Early America Podcast Series Releases TODAY!

· October 6th, 2020 · No Comments

Every year, the United States holds elections. Often these elections are for city, town, and state offices. Every two years, the United States holds federal elections, where the American people elect those who will represent and serve them in their national government.  How did elections in the United States develop? Who is American democracy for… Read More »

Reading on Elections in Vast Early America

· October 6th, 2020 · 2 Comments

Want to learn more about elections and voting in early America? We’ve compiled a list of suggested books, articles, and online resources that you might find helpful. We either used these works ourselves for production research or they were suggested by our guests. Happy researching! Books Richard R. Beeman, The Varieties of Political Experience in… Read More »

Change, COVID-Accelerated.

· September 14th, 2020 · No Comments

By Karin Wulf For the last years the OI team—staff, Board, and Council, with feedback from the community—has been thinking about how to serve ever wider public and scholarly communities.  We have expanded short-term and longer-term fellowship offerings through partnerships.  We have expanded opportunities for students and early career scholars in particular to share their… Read More »

Jack Custis, Race, and the Unseen in Colonial Virginia Portraits

· August 31st, 2020 · No Comments

by Janine Yorimoto Boldt One painfully obvious fact as one scrolls through Colonial Virginia Portraits is that the faces are overwhelmingly white. Colonial Virginia Portraits includes more than 500 recorded portraits of which approximately 95 are documented but no longer extant. Only four of the total represent a non-white person. Three of these feature unnamed… Read More »