Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

OI Books: A Transformative View of Race and Gender

· October 15th, 2018 · No Comments

Today’s post is part of our series marking the 75th anniversary of the Omohundro Institute by exploring the OI books that have had an impact on a scholar’s life. By Julie Richter I was in the middle of my dissertation research when Mick Nicholls, then a Research Fellow at Colonial Williamsburg, introduced me to Kathy… Read More »

Happy 4th Birthday, Ben Franklin’s World!

· October 12th, 2018 · No Comments

This week the Omohundro Institute’s award winning podcast, Ben Franklin’s World: a Podcast about Early American History turned four years old! This made us wonder, how would Ben have celebrated? Turns out his letters might offer us some hints. In 1767, Ben gifted a poem to Mary Stevenson for her birthday: “You’d have the Custom… Read More »

Opposing Views: Do Humanists Need to Add “Digital” to Their Titles?

· October 11th, 2018 · 1 Comment

Today’s posts are courtesy of two Ph.D. candidates in the William & Mary Department of History, Alexandra Macdonald and Peter Olsen-Harbich. We asked them to address the place of digital humanities learning—in particular, tutorials in the tools required to create digital humanities projects—in their current work and education. Learning to Stretch the Digital Vellum: Digital Literacy… Read More »

OI Books: The Book That Launched a Cross-Country Move

· October 8th, 2018 · No Comments

Today’s post is part of our series marking the 75th anniversary of the Omohundro Institute by exploring the OI books that have had an impact on a scholar’s life. By Michael S. Hindus Winthrop D. Jordan’s White Over Black was published on March 8, 1968. Over the course of the next six weeks, both the… Read More »

OI History: Tales from Former Apprentices, Part 5

· October 3rd, 2018 · No Comments

As part of our seventy-fifth anniversary, we at the Omohundro Institute continue to reflect on what makes our institution such a special place. One of those things is our Apprenticeship in Historical Editing. Today’s guest post comes from former apprentice Martha J. King who is now a senior editor at the Papers of Thomas Jefferson.… Read More »

OI Books: Our Changing Expectations of Scholarship

· October 1st, 2018 · 2 Comments

Today’s post is part of our series marking the 75th anniversary of the Omohundro Institute by exploring the OI books that have had an impact on a scholar’s life. by Natalie Zacek When I arrived at Johns Hopkins University in September 1992 to begin my graduate studies in history, my first meeting with my supervisor,… Read More »

OI History: Tales from Former Apprentices, Part 4

· September 26th, 2018 · No Comments

As part of our seventy-fifth anniversary, we at the Omohundro Institute continue to reflect on what makes our institution such a special place. One of those things is our Apprenticeship in Historical Editing. Today’s guest post comes from former apprentice Kevin Butterfield who is now the Executive Director of the Fred W. Smith National Library… Read More »