Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943

The Octo

Blogging Early America

Feeds from popular blogs selected by Joseph M. Adelman, Assistant Editor, Digital Initiatives

Uncommon Sense - the blog

Uncommon Sense - the blog

by Edward E. Andrews, Associate Professor of History at Providence College and author of “Tranquebar: Charting the Protestant International in the British Atlantic and Beyond” in the January 2017 edition of the William and Mary Quarterly We often speak at conferences and in our job talks about the importance of connecting research and teaching. And yet, when we really try to do it seriously and deliberately, it is much easier said than done. This is especially true at smaller liberal arts ins

Course of Human Events

The engrossed parchment of the Declaration of Independence was formally enshrined in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. on December 15, 1952, where it resides to this day. From its creation in the summer of 1776 to this final move, the Declaration of Independence travelled more than might be ...

Age of Revolutions

By Michael J. Bustamante The Cuban Revolution receives as much media and popular attention as any event in Latin American history. Yet as Jennifer Lambe and I argue in a forthcoming essay, the field of Cuban revolutionary history is at once saturated and, paradoxically, “underdeveloped.” Friends...

The Recipes Project

In September 2016, The Recipes Project celebrated its fourth birthday. We now have over 500 posts in our archives and over 120 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes.) But with so muc...

The Adverts 250 Project

GUEST CURATOR: Shannon Holleran What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “English and West-India Goods.” Nathan Angel sold “English and West-India Goods,” which is the part of this advertisement that stood out to me when I first read it since it reminded me o...

Borealia: Early Canada

Stephen Hay Daniel Vickers’s life and his work grew together. His colleagues, students, and friends remember him for his love of his family, his services to others, and his humane scholarship. That scholarship applied a disciplined imagination to discover the patterns of borrowing, lending, and wo...

The Junto

Casey Schmitt on crafting and curating a digital identity as a graduate student....

Past is Present

An earlier blog post mentioned that work was underway on an online resource about the Jacksonian Era at AAS featuring highlights from the William C. Cook Jacksonian Era collection. To whet your appetite in the weeks leading up to its debut we will be telling you about a few one-of-a-kind items from that collection. Today […]...