Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943

The Octo

Blogging Early America

Feeds from popular blogs selected by Joseph M. Adelman, Assistant Editor, Digital Initiatives

Uncommon Sense - the blog

Uncommon Sense - the blog

Carolyn Arena is a historian of the Atlantic World, focusing on histories of native peoples in the Americas and slavery. Dr. Arena is the 2017-2019 National Endowment of the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. Prior to joining the Omohundro Institute, she completed her PhD at Columbia University with funding from Foreign Language and Area Studies, Fulbright, the London School of Economics, and the Folger Shakespeare Library Seminars. While at

Age of Revolutions

By Tom Cutterham If the opening stages of the American Revolution were about the overthrow of tyranny, then its denouement was defined by the struggle against anarchy—at least, that is, from the perspective of the new nation’s elite. So fragile was the Confederation government in the mid-1780s, ...

Borealia: Early Canada

Elizabeth L. Jewett Time and a Place: An Environmental History of Prince Edward Island, edited by Edward MacDonald, Joshua MacFadyen and Irené Novaczek (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2016). As I read Time and a Place: An Environmental History of Prince Edward Island...

Black Perspectives

The 1830s was the high-tide of Jacksonianism, an era many historians consider the nadir of early American history. Although universal...

The Beehive

- Tuesday, 25 July, 9:00AM : America in World War I is a two-day teacher workshop put on by the Center for the Teaching of History at the MHS. Participants will immerse themselves in the letters, diaries, and photographs created by soldiers, Red Cross volunteers, and relief workers, among others. In...

U.S. Intellectual History

Can you pray a country into existence? This idea refueled warsick colonists as they made bloody progress through the American Revolution. Certainly, young William Palfrey thought so. On New Year’s Eve, 1775, Palfrey and his fellow patriots huddled in Christ […]...

The Junto

For the final installment of this summer's "Where Historians Work" series, Katy talks to Dr. Stephanie Gamble, Librarian for History and Anthropology in the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University....

Past is Present

The Whip (New York, New York), Oct. 8, 1842.  Racy papers were scandalous newspapers mostly published in the 1840s and 1850s in New York and Boston. AAS has one of the larger institutional collections of these lowbrow papers. Opportunities to acquire additional issues of these papers are few and far between. An issue for one […]...