Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture

Uncommon Sense—the blog

Archive for the ‘conferences’ Category

Virginia Consortium of Early Americanists

· January 25th, 2017 · No Comments

The third annual conference of the Virginia Consortium of Early Americanists meets this coming Saturday, January 28, at the Library of Virginia in Richmond. All are welcome. Founded in 2014 in order to provide a forum for the wealth of scholarship focused on early American history in Virginia, the group meets at least once a… Read More »

Summing up 3 days of discussion on slavery

· October 12th, 2016 · No Comments

The “Region and Nation in American Histories of Race and Slavery” conference took place at Mount Vernon, Virginia, this past weekend (October 6-9, 2016) before a crowd of over 125 people. With over three days of panels and papers as stimulation, the discussions were intense, long, and fruitful. Here a tiny smattering of the 1000+… Read More »

2017 Conference Applications Due Soon

· September 6th, 2016 · No Comments

The fall semester is just underway on campuses across the United States, but it’s already time to think about next summer’s conference season. In just one week (on September 15), we will reach the application deadline for the 23rd Annual Institute Conference, scheduled for June 15-18, 2017, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The program committee, chaired… Read More »

Translation and Transmission in the Early Americas: The Fourth Early Americanist ‘Summit’

· May 25th, 2016 · No Comments

Washington DC and the University of Maryland, 2–5 June, 2016 Traduttore, traitore; translatio studii; translatio imperii. The matter of translation is central to the study of the histories, literatures, and cultures of the early Americas, where speakers of indigenous, Indo-European, African, and Asian languages negotiated what words meant and who had the power to wield… Read More »

Reviving Revolution

· January 26th, 2016 · 2 Comments

Jordan Taylor, Ph.D. student at Indiana University and Regional Editor of the OI Map, has this report from the recent AHA conference. Now, he says, is a great time to be studying revolution. Find out why.